Temple of Olympian Zeus

Temple of Olympian Zeus

Temple of Olympian Zeus

The Temple of Olympian Zeus is a former colossal temple located in the center of Athens. The construction of the temple started in the 2nd century AD and ended almost 7 centuries later, during the reign of Roman Emperor Hadrian. He also ordered to raise two large statues of Zeus and himself made of ivory and gold there.

Of course, the construction process had been periodically frozen because of various reasons. Aristotle, an ancient Greek philosopher, cited that this temple was a great example how tyrannies were involving people into such ambitious and difficult construction processes so that they did not have any time and energy to rebel.

The original temple with 104 columns stood only for a century and was destroyed by barbarians in the 3rd century AD. Later, it was used as a source of building materials for other buildings in Athens so nowadays only 15 of columns are standing and the sixteenth one lies on the ground. Unfortunately, the statues also have not survived until our days. However, even those sixteen columns are enough to imagine how the largest temple of Ancient Greece looked like.

Lycabettus Hill – The highest point of Athens

Lycabettus Hill – The highest point of Athens

Lycabettus Hill – The highest point of Athens

Lycabettus Hill is the highest point of Athens with a height of 277 meters. It is surrounded by one of the most prestigious districts of city – Kolonaki. Lycabettus means “path of the wolves” but you do not need to worry because the name is coming from the ancient times and nowadays, you are safe to get to the top of this mountain by walk, although is not easy for most people, in which case you can simply use the funicular railway.

Many travelers prefer to go there during the sunset to take the most breathtaking views. There is a coin operated binocular viewer but you better take your own to avoid long queues. A beautiful Greek chapel is situated on the top of the hill – Agios Giorgios. There is also a large open-air amphitheatre where a lot of local and international artists performed.

Plaka neighborhood, Anafiotika Area

Plaka neighborhood, Anafiotika Area

Plaka neighborhood, Anafiotika Area

Plaka is one of the oldest and most picturesque neighborhoods of Athens and is very popular among the tourists. It is situated near the slopes of Acropolis hill and attracts travelers with its nice buildings, cozy cafes, restaurants, art galleries and souvenir shops. You can spend several hours walking in its labyrinth-like streets and enjoy every moment of being there.

Anafiotika area of Plaka neighborhood will make you feel yourself like you are on one of the Greek islands thanks to its small white houses and narrow streets with a lot of stairs. The first habitants of this area came to Athens from Anafi island so you already know where the origin of the name comes from.

Ancient Agora of Athens: Temple of Hephaestus, Stoa of Attalos, Byzantine Church of the Holy Apostles

Ancient Agora of Athens: Temple of Hephaestus, Stoa of Attalos, Byzantine Church of the Holy Apostles

Ancient Agora of Athens: Temple of Hephaestus, Stoa of Attalos, Byzantine Church of the Holy Apostles

Ancient Agora of Athens is an archaeological site located in the heart of the city which will not leave you indifferent because there are at least three masterpieces of ancient Greek architecture on its territory.

First of them is the Stoa of Attalos (stoa means covered walkway) which was used by Ancient Greeks for commercial purposes. The original building was destroyed by Germans and nowadays tourists can enjoy the restored version of it thanks to American School of Classical Studies. There is a great museum with a unique collection of ancient items and sculptures located in the building.

The next well-preserved building situated not far from it is the Byzantine Church of the Holy Apostles built in 1000 AD which definitely deserves your attention thanks to its beautiful and unique architecture even if you are not a fan of religious sites.

The final iconic building which will blow your mind is the Temple of Hephaestus, the god of fire, the son of Zeus and Hera. The construction of this impressive temple was completed two years before Parthenon and fortunately, it remained intact until our days.

Useful Tips: 

  • Every first Sunday from November 1st to March 31st the admission is free
  • You can get a combo ticket for 30 euros (reduced price is 15 euros) which is valid for 5 days to visit the following attractions: Acropolis of Athens and its south and north slopes, Ancient Agora of Athens and the museum situated in Stoa of Attalos, Roman Agora of Athens, Hadrian’s Library, Olympieio, Archaeological Museum of KerameikosArchaeological Site of LykeionKerameikos 
Acropolis: Parthenon, Erechtheion, Theatre of Dionysus, Odeon of Herodes

Acropolis: Parthenon, Erechtheion, Theatre of Dionysus, Odeon of Herodes

Acropolis: Parthenon, Erechtheion, Theatre of Dionysus, Odeon of Herodes

Acropolis of Athens is a must-see attraction for every tourist who visits the capital of Greece even for a short period. It is an ancient monument complex situated on the rocky hill and is considered the cradle of Philosophy, Theatre, Freedom of Speech, Democracy and other significant elements of Western culture.

The most important icon of Acropolis is, of course, the temple of Parthenon, dedicated to goddess Athena, who was considered to be the patroness of Athenians. The temple is situated on the top of the hill and its restoration process is currently ongoing.

Besides Parthenon, there is also another magnificent temple – Erechtheion, dedicated to both Athena and Poseidon, god of the sea. This architectural masterpiece is famous for its porch with columns shaped like female figures (caryatids) – “Porch of Maidens”.
On the slopes of the Acropolis, there are also many ancient sights for you to explore like the first theatre of the world – Theatre of Dionysus or Odeon of Herodes Atticus, a stone theatre built in 161 AD which is still used as a concert hall.

Useful Tips: 

  • It is not easy to climb Acropolis hill, so there is an elevator for disabled people only. Please do not forget to call beforehand to check working days and hours of the elevator.
  • It is also impossible to be there during hot afternoons so if you visit Greece in Summer, try to get there in the early morning or in the evening.
  • Every first Sunday from November 1st to March 31st the admission is free.
  • You can get a combo ticket for 30 euros (reduced price is 15 euros) which is valid for 5 days to visit the following attractions: Acropolis of Athens and its south and north slopes, Ancient Agora of Athens and the museum situated in Stoa of Attalos, Roman Agora of Athens, Hadrian’s Library, Olympieio, Archaeological Museum of KerameikosArchaeological Site of LykeionKerameikos. 

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